New Theme, Complete with Page Header Graphic

Disclaimer: There are a lot of links in this post. I suggest that anyone who reads this views each and every one. You will be a better person for it, and will understand why I’m drooling about this like a small child.

Some of the links may contain items which may be considered “not safe for work.” Be advised.

As you may have noticed, the theme has changed again for the site. I found one I really really like, and I’ve been able to make it my own. Now, you’ll see a title graphic on the pages of a string bassist. The photo is by Chris Weeks, a superb professional photographer whose work can be found all over the place, and you probably don’t realise it. Here’s a sample from his gallery at Deviantart. Keep digging, and once you get past the photos of the celebrities of the moment, you can see what I really love about his photos: the realness. This photo of two older men playing chess… or the things he’ll notice and shoot that most people would miss… nevermind the amazing depth of field he can pull out of a shot. I wish I had a millionth of his talent and ability behind the camera.

Anyway, thank you, Chris, for allowing me to use your beautiful picture on my site.

It’s done.

Well, I moved it. Hooray. I have a sneaking feeling that I’ll be doing this one or two more times for the others. :) But, that’s okay, because I enjoy it in a kinda sick, twisted way. Hooray for WordPress. Let’s hope I don’t find something I really hate in the next few days. :)

Replacing Movable Type with WordPress?

Will I replace Movable Type with WordPress? Maybe. They’ve made a lot of progress with 2.0 of WordPress. It’s a lot cleaner than I remember. They’ve tossed in a bunch of AJAX and the like that makes the interface a lot smoother. The themes are a lot easier to manage (picking preselected themes, that is) than MT. Plugin management is also better.

As for downsides, there are always some. First, the templates are more complex in WordPress. Movable Type’s templates are like editing HTML. Here, it’s editing PHP. Second, MT allows multiple blogs per installation (not that it matters with my current setup). Also, there’s the comfort level. I’ve become comfortable with Movable Type over the past year-ish. It’s a big step, but, it’s one I might have to take.

I’ve shown this to one of my other users and they like the WordPress administration side better. So, we’ll see.

Hotlinkers will be punished.

Today while analysing the traffic to and from the site, I noticed that I had got a few links from a blog that was hosted on blogger.com that I didn’t recognize. Interested, I visited the page. It was some “high oil prices suck and so does Bush” (some of which I don’t disagree with). But, I didn’t see how my site was involved… until I searched the source. The guy was linking to an image from this post about high gas prices following Hurricane Katrina.

Folks, this is called theft.

So, I adjusted the image using the magic of .htaccess and some Paint magic.

The content of my blog is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 2.5 license. That means you can use the content of my site, provided you give me credit on your site with the content and you license your work under an identical license. If the guy in question would have contacted me, I would have said he could copy the image to his server (and use his bandwidth) while giving me credit. As it is, he stole my content and my bandwidth. Bad…

Site Wonkyness: php5 module update breaks dynamic site

So, I logged on today and happened to visit my own site, and realised that it had completely went wonky. At first glance, it looked like the database had crapped on itself. There were only two blog entries appearing on the homepage, all of the archives were gone, and even some other pages which were dynamically generated had gone totally wonky. Logging into the backend of Movable Type showed everything was intact still. So, I started to troubleshoot the display problems.

Today, I updated the following modules via FreeBSD’s Ports collection:
devel/p5-Class-Spiffy (p5-Class-Spiffy-0.12)
devel/p5-Spiffy (p5-Spiffy-0.29)
mail/p5-Mail-Tools (p5-Mail-Tools-1.67)
www/p5-HTML-Template (p5-HTML-Template-2.7_1)
devel/p5-Test-Base (p5-Test-Base-0.47)

Something in one (or multiple) of those broke dynamic pages. So, I converted both my site and Josh’s site back to static pages, and all should be fine now.